2016/03/26

Where is my tooth?

My 7-year-old son suddenly said yesterday morning:

"Oh? Where is my tooth?"

One of his front teeth was falling out recently.

I asked him:

"Didn't your tooth fall out yet before going to bed yesterday?"

"No, it may have fell out while I was sleeping."

He answered.

I looked for his tooth when I spread the futon, but I was not able to find it.

I wonder where on earth it has gone.

Maybe he coulld have swallowed his tooth?

Or has the Tooth Fairy already taken his tooth?


Note:

In fact, I didn't know about the Tooth Fairy until I heard about it in the dialogue practice of the NHK Radio English conversation program last year.

I wrote about the Japanese custom about milk tooth in my previous post:
http://a-o-j-m.blogspot.jp/2015/09/my-tooth-finally-fell-out_3.html




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4 件のコメント:

  1. Hello Kumi-san,

    I don't think I have ever managed to swallow any of my milk teeth as a child while I was asleep. I always tended to pull them out. It's a bad habit to have but I could not resist it.

    I have always thought that the Tooth Fairy is a big scam to get money out of parents :). So the fact that it is something you don't tend to have in Japan probably works in your favor.

    There is a very funny movie about tooth fairies with an ex-wrestler in it, called "Tooth Fairy" here's a link to the trailer:

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0808510/

    I watched it when it first came out and found it funny, but then I like silly children's movies.

    Here is a list of some of the other issues found with the post:

    This line:
    One of his front tooth was falling out recently.

    Should be:
    One of his front teeth was falling out recently.

    Reason: It's teeth when you are referring to a single tooth as part of a group. When it's a single tooth that you find or that you wish to single out it's tooth. If that all sounds totally confusing, it is, so don't worry about it:

    Examples:
    I ate cold ice cream and it made my teeth hurt.
    I ate a hard candy and heard a tooth crack.
    I bit into an apple and noticed a tooth in it.
    I look forward to the day when I loose all my (baby/milk) teeth.
    People who have dentures often say "Give me a moment while I put my teeth in"
    Crocodiles have many teeth, if they lose a single tooth, they will not care as the tooth will regrow. In fact all their teeth regrow constantly the same as sharks teeth.
    On a cold day my teeth will chatter.
    I love eating cake but I have one rotten tooth which always aches when I do. Oh how I wish all my teeth were healthy so I could enjoy more cake.

    This line:
    "Hasn't your tooth fallen out yet before going to bed yesterday, right?"

    Should be:
    "Didn't your tooth fall out before going to bed yesterday?"

    This line:
    I wonder where on earth it was gone.

    Should be:
    I wonder where on earth it has gone.

    Or:
    I wonder where on earth it could be.

    This line:
    May he have swallowed his tooth?

    Should be:
    Maybe he could have swallowed his tooth?

    This line:
    Or has Tooth Fairy already took his tooth?

    Should be:
    Or has the Tooth Fairy already taken his tooth?

    Reason: In general when talking about a specific Tooth Fairy you almost always have to put the word "the" before it. I am not sure why but just saying Tooth Fairy sounds a little incomplete. Also took was changed to taken because it sounds more correct, although as far as I can tell took is also correct grammatically. It just sounds better in this take so say taken.


    This line:
    In fact, I didn't know about Tooth Fairy until I listened to about it in the dialogue practice of the NHK Radio English conversation program last year.

    Should be:
    In fact, I didn't know about the Tooth Fairy until I heard about it in the dialogue practice of the NHK Radio English conversation program last year.

    This line:
    I wrote about Japanese custom about milk tooth in my previous post:

    Should be:
    I wrote about the Japanese custom for milk teeth in my previous post:

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    1. Hello Terry.
      The movie looked interesting!
      Maybe it was not released in Japan.
      Tooth and teeth are confusing.
      I think plural form is one of the interesting and strange differences between English and Japanese.
      Thank you so much!

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  2. Hello Kumi san !
    I started reading your blog few days ago, and I find it so funny and interesting ! I am 34 years old, I live in France near Paris, and I am a mother of a 7 weeks old baby girl. I went 6 times to Japan because I love this country and its culture. I am not an english native speaker, so I am not able to correct you, but I will comment from time to time if you don't mind.
    In France, it is not the "tooth fairy" it is the "little mouse". Your article was the occasion for me to check where it comes from and it seems that this is from an old fairy tail... Funny !
    Please continue your blog I love it
    Helene

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    1. Hello Helene.
      I was really glad to read your comment.
      You have just become a mother!
      Your baby must be adorable.
      I didn't know about little mouse.
      The cultural differences are really interesting!
      I stop writing my blog now because I need to prepare taking TOEIC test, but I will write it soon so please come to my blog again and leave a comment if you would like.
      Thank you so much!

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